National Child Day

Every year, November 20th is National Child Day.  Proclaimed by the Government of Canada in 1993, it celebrates two historic events for children - the adoption of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of the Child in 1959 and the United Nations  Convention on the Rights of the Child, adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on November 20, 1989.

 

Celebrating the Convention's 25th Birthday:

Rights Posters

On November 20, 2014, the Convention on the Rights of the Child turns 25 years old. To mark this event, we have created posters for people to complete and share with us on social media, using the hashtags #ChildRightsSK and #YouthVoiceSK.

We encourage you to download, fill in and share these posters with us on Facebook (www.facebook.com/saskadvocate) or Twitter (https://twitter.com/saskadvocate). 

 

 

Download the posters here: 

I have the right to...                      Every child has the right to...

Every youth has the right to...         Children's rights are important because...

 

More on the Convention

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child was ratified by the Canadian Government on December 11, 1991.  Likewise, the Saskatchewan Legislature confirmed its own support earlier on the very same date, with the Provincial Government stating:

“Support for the Convention is essential because it reaffirms our responsibility for the care and well-being of all children in our society. The Convention also serves as a reminder that as long as there are still children in this province who are not receiving the care and protection to which they are entitled, there is more which must be done.”

For teacher, caregiver and youth resources about National Child Day visit the Public Health Agency of Canada.

 

National Child Day Op/Eds by the Children's Advocate:

2009

Commemorating the 20th Anniversary of the Adoption of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child

2008

Children...Our Most Precious Resource

2007

Saskatchewan's Children...From "Paper" Rights to "Lived" Rights